rspca

Life on the Road as an RSPCA Inspector

Animal Welfare Legislation Queensland Law RSPCA Inspectors Article taken from The Biscuit magazine
RSPCA Queensland has just over 20 Inspectors responding to animal cruelty complaints right across the state. To become one, you have to be flexible with your working hours as you never know when an animal emergency will arise.

This isn’t a Ricky Gervais movie, but he certainly would approve of what our RSPCA Inspectors do in their day-to-day life to help animals in need. We chat to Chief Inspector Daniel Young at RSPCA Queensland who has been helping animals for 20 years.

Chief Inspector at RSPCA Queensland, Daniel Young

“Many people ask about the work of the Inspectors. RSPCA Inspectors are some of the hardest working people I know,” Daniel says.

Being an RSPCA Inspector requires dedication, time and patience. RSPCA Queensland as just over 20 Inspectors responding to animal cruelty complaints right across the state. To become an Inspector, you have to be flexible with your working hours as you never know when an animal emergency will arise. Sometimes what lays ahead can be gruelling in terms of emotional wellbeing and physical demands.

Chief Inspector Daniel says, “Inspectors often work long hours covering vast distances to ensure that all complainants are investigated. As an Inspector you are assigned a region, either in a metropolitan area or one of our regional locations. Inspectors are required to be available for after hours emergencies as well as rostered weekends.”

Being a charity and receiving less than 3 percent of government funding per year, resources are limited and RSPCA Inspectors sadly cannot cover every inch of Queensland. Which is why it is vital that the public become the eyes and ears for our Inspectors and report animal cruelty and welfare concerns. If the complaint happens to fall outside of where RSPCA Queensland inspectors operate, the report is transferred to Biosecurity Queensland for investigation. They have the same investigatory powers as RSPCA Inspectors.

Despite the tough role that RSPCA Inspectors undertake, vacancies are highly sought after and do not arise often. When a position as an RSPCA Inspector is made available, we advertise here on the website and sometimes through external employment websites and the newspaper.

RSPCA Queensland Inspector and dog

Daniel is often asked, how do I become an Inspector?

“While there is no specific course for becoming an Inspector in Queensland, RSPCA Inspectors have a diverse range of qualifications including investigative experience and animal husbandry. Both knowledge of animals and handling along with investigative skills are crucial to the job. Various courses are offered in these areas through TAFE and other institutions. Computer literacy; interest in and knowledge of animal welfare; efficient and effective communication skills; good character; a current and appropriate driver's license and physical fitness are also requirements of the role. Inspectors must also have appropriate tertiary qualifications or equivalent experience.”

So if you think you have the aptitude and skills required to become an RSPCA Inspector. Keep an eye on our website for opportunities and also consider volunteering at the RSPCA.


Emma Lagoon
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